Ed Young References

Ed Young References

Ed Young Interview

https://youtu.be/HAnqcDm6eMU

Mark Reibstien Interview

https://youtu.be/ca2Ly4Vpb5Y

 Embracing the Child

http://www.embracingthechild.org/Bookspecialyoung.htm

Ed Young Website

http://www.edyoungart.com/about.html

Author for Kids

http://www.author4kids.com/edyoung.html

Paper Tigers

http://www.papertigers.org/interviews/archived_interviews/eyoung.html

BBC Interview with Ed Young

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-16081184

National Center for Children’s Illustrated Literature

http://nccil.org/experience/artists/Young/index.htm

Seven Impossible Interview

http://blaine.org/sevenimpossiblethings/?p=1576 

Scholastic

http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/contributor/ed-young

Laurence Yep List of Work

Sweetwater. New York: Harper & Row, 1973.

Dragonwings. New York: Harper & Row, 1975;

Child of the Owl. New York: Harper & Row, 1977.

Seademons. New York: Harper & Row, 1977.

Sea Glass. New York: Harper & Row, 1979.

Dragon of the Lost Sea. New York: Harper & Row, 1982.

Kind Hearts and Gentle Monsters. New York: Harper & Row, 1982.

The Mark Twain Murders. New York: Four Winds, 1982.

Liar, Liar. New York: Morrow, 1983.

The Serpent’s Children. New York: Harper & Row, 1984.

The Tom Sawyer Fires. New York: Morrow, 1984.

Dragon Steel. New York: Harper & Row, 1985.

Mountain Light. New York: Harper & Row, 1985.

Shadow Lord: A Star Trek Novel No. 22. New York: Pocket Books, 1985.

Monster Makers, Inc. New York: Arbor House, 1986.

The Curse of the Squirrel. Illus. Dirk Zimmer. New York: Random House, 1987; L’ecureuil Ensorcele. Illus. Dirk Zimmer. Trans. Marie-Claud Favrecu. Saint-Lambert: Heritage, 1989.

The Rainbow People. New York: Harper & Row, 1989.

When the Bomb Dropped: The Story of Hiroshima. Illus. Robert Andrew Parker. New York: Random House, 1990.

Dragon Cauldron. New York: HarperCollins, 1991.

The Star Fisher. New York: Morrow, 1991.

Tongues of Jade. New York: HarperCollins, 1991.

The Lost Garden. Englewood Cliffs: Messner, 1991.

Dragon War. New York: HarperCollins, 1992.

Dragon’s Gate. New York: HarperCollins, 1993.

The Butterfly Boy. Illus. Jeanne M. Lee. New York: Farrar Straus & Giroux, 1993.

The Man Who Tricked a Ghost. Illus. Isadore Seltzer. Mahwah, NJ: Bridgewater, 1993.

The Shell Woman & the King: A Chinese Folktale. Illus. Yang Ming-Yi. New York: Dial, 1993.

The Boy Who Swallowed Snakes. Illus. Jean and Mou-sien Tseng. New York: Scholastic, 1994.

The Ghost Fox. Illus. Jean and Mou-sien Tseng. New York: Scholastic, 1994.

The Junior Thunder Lord Illus. Robert Van Nutt. Mahwah, NJ: Bridgewater, 1994.

Tiger Woman. Illus. Robert Roth. Mahwah, NJ: Bridgewater, 1994.

The City of Dragons. Illus. Jean and Mou-sien Tseng. New York: Scholastic, 1995.

Later, Gater. New York: Hyperion, 1995.

Thief of Hearts. New York: Harper, 1995.

Tree of Dreams: Ten Tales from the Garden of Night. Illus. Isadore Seltzer. Mahwah, NJ: Bridgewater, 1995.

Hiroshima. New York: Scholastic, 1995.

Dragon Prince. Illus. by Kam Mak. New York: HarperCollins, 1996.

Ribbons New York: Putnam, 1996.

The Mongolian Shepherd. Illus. by Jean and Mou-sien Tseng. New York: Scholastic, 1996.

The Case of the Goblin People. New York: HarperCollins, 1997.

Cockroach Cooties, Disney-Hyperion, 2000.

The Magic Paintbrush, Fitzgerald Books, 2000.

When the Circus Came to Town, Baker & Taylor, 2001.

Dream Soul, HarperCollins, 2002.

The Tigers Apprentice, Thorndike Press, 2003.

The Earth Dragon Awakens The San Fransisco Earthquake of 1906, Puffon 2006.

The Magic Paintbrush, Paw Prints, 2008.

City of Fire, Starscape, Macmillan, 2009.

The Dragon’s Child: A Story of Angel Island, New York: HarperCollins, 2011.

City of Ice, Starscape Publisher, 2012.

A dragons Guide to the Care and Feeding of Humans, Random House Children’s Books,2015.

Ed Young Author List of Work

The Rooster’s Horns: A Chinese Puppet Play to Make and Perform, 1978.

The Terrible Nung Gwama: A Chinese Folktale, 1978.

The Lion and the Mouse: An Aesop Fable, 1979.

High on a Hill: A Book of Chinese Riddles, 1980.

Up a Tree, 1983.

The Other Bone, 1984.

Lon Po Po: A Red-Riding Hood Story from China, 1989.

Seven Blind Mice, 1992 (a version of  The Blind Men and an Elephant).

Moon Mother: A Narrative American Creation Tale, 1993.

Red Thread, 1993.

Little Plum, 1994.

Donkey Trouble, 1995.

Pinocchio, 1995.

Night Visitors, 1995.

Cat and Rat The Legend of the Chinese Zodiac, 1995.

Mouse Match: A Chinese Folktale, 1997 (a version of The Mouse Turned into a Maid).

Genesis, 1997.

Voices of the Heart, 1997.

The Lost Horse: A Chinese Folktale, 1998.

Monkey King, 2001.

What About Me?, 2002.

I, Doko: The Tale of the Basket, 2004.

Sons of the Dragon King, 2004.

Beyond the Great Mountains, 2005.

My Mei Mei, 2006.

Tiger of the Snows, 2006.

Hook, 2009.

The House Baba Built, 2011.

Should You Be a River, 2015.

Historical Overview of Chinese Folk and Fairy Tales

China’s population is beyond 1.3 billion people ranking it as the most populated country on Earth.  Chinese civilization is one of the oldest, at nearly 4000 years old, in the world.  Chinese Folklore and Fairy Tales goes beyond text as it is conveyed through song, dance, and artwork.  Stories often explain the nature of humans in addition to explaining historical and legendary events throughout history. Love and desire are also popular topics in Chinese Folk and Fairy Tale stories. Supernatural beings are frequently portrayed in Chinese literature, especially the dragon.  the dragon is arguably the most important creature in Chinese Mythology. The dragon is a symbol of power and advocate of gods.

Originally Folk songs were accompanied by dance to elevate storytelling to a well respected type of performance.  Chinese Folklore and Fairytales were also heavily influenced by Taoism, Confucianism and Buddhism.  These stories fell out of favor for centuries as China thought to elevate itself.  Most of these stories are written or told in vernacular Chinese, or commoner’s speech.  It was not until the 1920’s Chinese folklore became popular again as a movement began to accept this version of Chinese in education and literature.  As these works were rediscovered, a lost connection to its past was reclaimed in the form of Chinese Folklore and Fairy Tales.